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nary

[nair-ee] /ˈnɛər i/
adjective, Older Use.
1.
not any; no; never a:
nary a sound.
Origin
1740-1750
1740-50; variant of ne'er a never a
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for nary
  • Not a plank left in the dam, and nary a bridge on the river.
  • He was then perfunctory-marched through two days of interviews by depressed handlers, with nary a call later.
  • They said nary a word and the service was uninterrupted.
  • There was a nary a soul who wasn't aware of my quest to enter the profession.
  • There was nary a word officially from the organization.
  • Every foot of the proposed area is already federally owned, and nary a soul lives on it, so audible opposition is limited.
  • They displays are crisp, clean and buttonless, with nary a button on the face.
  • The result is buttery smooth graphics and nary a pixel point to be seen.
  • Unlike others bags we've reviewed, there was nary a loose thread or stray seam to be found.
  • But it is unfortunate that much of the mainstream media largely bought their cover story with nary a question.
British Dictionary definitions for nary

nary

/ˈnɛərɪ/
adverb
1.
(dialect) not; never: nary a man was left
Word Origin
C19: variant of ne'er a never a
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for nary
adj.

1746, alteration of ne'er a, short for never a.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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7
7
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