necessarily

[nes-uh-sair-uh-lee, -ser-]
adverb
1.
by or of necessity; as a matter of compulsion or requirement: You don't necessarily have to attend.
2.
as a necessary, logical, or inevitable result: That conclusion doesn't necessarily follow.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English; see necessary, -ly

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
necessarily (ˈnɛsɪsərɪlɪ, ˌnɛsɪˈsɛrɪlɪ)
 
adv
1.  as an inevitable or natural consequence: girls do not necessarily like dolls
2.  as a certainty: he won't necessarily come

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Example sentences
The students who thrive are not necessarily the ones who come in with the
  perfect scores.
Some experts say aggression in dogs is not necessarily breed-specific-owners
  may share the blame.
The idea that different sensory inputs are necessarily processed in disparate
  regions may be obsolete.
It is true that people are kind but not necessarily welcoming to an outsider.
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