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neophyte

[nee-uh-fahyt] /ˈni əˌfaɪt/
noun
1.
a beginner or novice:
He's a neophyte at chess.
2.
Roman Catholic Church. a novice.
3.
a person newly converted to a belief, as a heathen, heretic, or nonbeliever; proselyte.
4.
Primitive Church. a person newly baptized.
Origin of neophyte
1540-1550
1540-50; < Late Latin neophytus newly planted < Greek neóphytos. See neo-, -phyte
Related forms
neophytic
[nee-uh-fit-ik] /ˌni əˈfɪt ɪk/ (Show IPA),
neophytish
[nee-uh-fahy-tish] /ˈni əˌfaɪ tɪʃ/ (Show IPA),
adjective
neophytism
[nee-uh-fahy-tiz-uh m] /ˈni ə faɪˌtɪz əm/ (Show IPA),
noun
Synonyms
1. greenhorn, tyro.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for neophyte
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The width of the Irish car is enormous, and occasionally leads the neophyte into trouble.

    Carriages & Coaches Ralph Straus
  • Never before had neophyte lived so entirely for the happiness of others.

  • Dr. Dieffenbach was present when an aged tohunga was giving a lesson to a neophyte.

    Curiosities of Superstition W. H. Davenport Adams
  • We welcome you, the neophyte, who has joined us in our pilgrimage.

    Evening Round Up William Crosbie Hunter
  • Once the joys of Chandu become perceptible to the neophyte, a great need is felt—a crying need.

    The Yellow Claw Sax Rohmer
British Dictionary definitions for neophyte

neophyte

/ˈniːəʊˌfaɪt/
noun
1.
a person newly converted to a religious faith
2.
(RC Church) a novice in a religious order
3.
a novice or beginner
Derived Forms
neophytic (ˌniːəʊˈfɪtɪk) adjective
Word Origin
C16: via Church Latin from New Testament Greek neophutos recently planted, from neos new + phuton a plant
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for neophyte
n.

"new convert," 1550s, from Ecclesiastical Latin neophytus, from Greek neophytos "a new convert," noun use of adjective meaning "newly initiated, newly converted," literally "newly planted," from neos "new" (see new) + phytos "grown; planted," verbal adjective of phyein "cause to grow, beget, plant" (see physic). Church sense is from I Tim. iii:6. Rare before 19c. General sense of "one who is new to any subject" is first recorded 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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