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newish

[noo-ish, nyoo-] /ˈnu ɪʃ, ˈnyu-/
adjective
1.
rather new.
Origin
1560-1570
1560-70; new + -ish1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for newish
  • If you're still newish to cooking, the learning curve is going to be steeper.
  • It's newish, stylish, and has a lovely deck right on the bay.
  • So, you've got a newish set of problems and a newish set of tools.
  • With all the newish geo-related blogs nowadays, there's plenty to read.
  • Maybe a new mayor and a newish council can pull this off.
  • The house looked newish and was ruined by too many weird-shaped windows, but someone had been smart enough to spare the trees.
  • Open governance is still a newish idea even in advanced economies.
  • Both are newish, and they use quite different technology.
  • In any case, some restrictions matter less in a newish market than they would in a mature one.
British Dictionary definitions for newish

newish

/ˈnjuːɪʃ/
adjective
1.
fairly new
Derived Forms
newishly, adverb
newishness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for newish
adj.

1560s, from new + -ish.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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