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newly

[noo-lee, nyoo-] /ˈnu li, ˈnyu-/
adverb
1.
recently; lately:
a newly married couple.
2.
anew or afresh:
a newly repeated slander.
3.
in a new manner or form:
a room newly decorated.
Origin of newly
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English nīwlice. See new, -ly
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for newly
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • You know, Thor, that it's an old custom for newly married people to go to church together on the first Sunday they're at home.

  • newly facing the evil of the world, she was a rampant reformer at once.

    K Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • Women are accustomed to give such opinions respecting the wives of their newly married friends.

    The Newcomes William Makepeace Thackeray
  • When game is used for soup, it must be newly killed, and quite fresh.

  • Harriet was appliqueing velvet violets on a gray chiffon scarf and was doing it with the zest of the newly liberated.

    The Heart's Kingdom Maria Thompson Daviess
British Dictionary definitions for newly

newly

/ˈnjuːlɪ/
adverb
1.
recently; lately or just: a newly built shelf
2.
again; afresh; anew: newly raised hopes
3.
in a new manner; differently: a newly arranged room
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for newly
adv.

Old English niwlice "lately, recently;" see new + -ly (2). Cf. German neulich, Danish nylig, Swedish nyligen.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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