nexus

[nek-suhs]
noun, plural nexuses, nexus.
1.
a means of connection; tie; link.
2.
a connected series or group.
3.
the core or center, as of a matter or situation.
4.
Cell Biology. a specialized area of the cell membrane involved in intercellular communication and adhesion.

Origin:
1655–65; < Latin nexus a binding, joining, fastening, equivalent to nect(ere) to bind, fasten, tie + -tus suffix of v. action, with tt > s

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World English Dictionary
nexus (ˈnɛksəs)
 
n , pl nexus
1.  a means of connection between members of a group or things in a series; link; bond
2.  a connected group or series
 
[C17: from Latin: a binding together, from nectere to bind]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

nexus
1663, "bond, link, means of communication," from L. nexus, pp. of nectere "to bind," from PIE base *ned- "to bind, tie" (see net (n.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

nexus nex·us (něk'səs)
n. pl. nexus or nex·us·es
See gap junction.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
What separates the groups is a whole nexus of conditioning and background.
The company maintains that because it has no physical presence in the state, it
  has no nexus requiring it to collect tax.
Like it or not, money is at the nexus of energy and emissions decisions.
The nexus of influence has shifted in the last few years.
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