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nonce

[nons] /nɒns/
noun
1.
the present, or immediate, occasion or purpose (usually used in the phrase for the nonce).
Origin
1150-1200
1150-1200; Middle English nones, in phrase for the nones, by faulty division of for then ones for the once (Middle English then dative singular of the1; ones once)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for nonce
  • So in reality this is all nonce of a competing monopolies.
  • Bond vigilantes have mostly been replaced by printing, for the nonce.
  • He affects a vacant stare and, for the nonce, little control of his facial muscles.
  • For the nonce you weren't some tame and humble inmate.
  • In the cryptographic sense, a nonce is a random or a pseudo-random number that has two uses.
  • Using a nonce as a challenge is a different requirement than a random challenge, because a nonce is not necessarily unpredictable.
  • Using a nonce as a challenge is a different requirement from a random challenge, because a nonce is not necessarily unpredictable.
  • The nonce must be a data block that is unique to each execution of the encryption operation.
British Dictionary definitions for nonce

nonce1

/nɒns/
noun
1.
the present time or occasion (now only in the phrase for the nonce)
Word Origin
C12: from the phrase for the nonce, a mistaken division of for then anes, literally: for the once, from then dative singular of the + anesonce

nonce2

/nɒns/
noun
1.
(prison slang) a rapist or child molester; a sexual offender
Word Origin
C20: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for nonce
n.

abstracted from phrase for þe naness (c.1200) "for a special occasion, for a particular purpose," itself a misdivision (see N for other examples) of for þan anes "for the one," in reference to a particular occasion or purpose, the þan being from Middle English dative definite article þam (see the). The phrase used from early 14c. as an empty filler in metrical composition. As an adjective from 1884.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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