oblivion

[uh-bliv-ee-uhn]
noun
1.
the state of being completely forgotten or unknown: a former movie star now in oblivion.
2.
the state of forgetting or of being oblivious: the oblivion of sleep.
3.
official disregard or overlooking of offenses; pardon; amnesty.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French < Latin oblīviōn- (stem of oblīviō), equivalent to oblīv(īscī) to forget + -iōn- -ion; see ob-

self-oblivion, noun
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World English Dictionary
oblivion (əˈblɪvɪən)
 
n
1.  the condition of being forgotten or disregarded
2.  the state of being mentally withdrawn or blank
3.  law an intentional overlooking, esp of political offences; amnesty; pardon
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin oblīviō forgetfulness, from oblīviscī to forget]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

oblivion
late 14c., "state or fact of forgetting," from L. oblivionem (nom. oblivio) "forgetfulness," from oblivisci (pp. oblitus) "forget," originally "even out, smooth over," from ob "over" + root of levis "smooth."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Conspiracy theorists will insist that an entire population was banished to a
  faraway island, where they step-danced to oblivion.
Many came so close to making the layout but now would fade into oblivion.
The bottom of a moulin-a vertical shaft in the ice-opened up and sucked the
  entire lake into oblivion.
The vast majority of them sink into virtual oblivion once they are published.
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