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[ob-skyoo-rey-shuh n] /ˌɒb skyʊˈreɪ ʃən/
the act of obscuring.
the state of being obscured.
Origin of obscuration
late Middle English
1425-75; late Middle English < Latin obscūrātiōn- (stem of obscūrātiō) a darkening, equivalent to obscūrāt(us), past participle of obscūrāre (obscūr(us) dark + -ātus -ate1) + -iōn- -ion; see -ation Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for obscuration
Historical Examples
  • Sir Norman Lockyer believed he saw the obscuration of a large region by clouds, this obscuration continuing for some hours.

    Mars and its Mystery Edward Sylvester Morse
  • Far and nigh Mystery and obscuration none, Yet nowhere any moon or sun!

    The Victories of Love Coventry Patmore
  • He diffused sweetness and light in an era marked by bitterness and obscuration.

  • That they both refer to the temporary eclipse, seclusion, or obscuration of a brilliant being, is evident.

    Indian Fairy Tales Anonymous
  • The problem is to get the utmost of modelling or expression with the minimum of obscuration.

  • How long that obscuration shall last, is known only to the power that directs all human events.

    John Brown, Soldier of Fortune Hill Peebles Wilson
  • In other instances the obscuration has been produced by very protracted dry fogs.

    The Story of the Solar System George F. Chambers
  • As they came on in numbers too great for Ipley to stand against, an obscuration fell over all.

    Sandra Belloni, Complete George Meredith
  • Despite the obscuration of imperfect dominance, polydactylism in poultry proves itself to be a unit-character that segregates.

  • Recent observations of these eclipses, through glass of different colors, show variations in the time of obscuration.

    The Future of Astronomy Edward C. Pickering
Word Origin and History for obscuration

late 15c., from Latin obscurationem (nominative obscuratio) "a darkening, obscuring," noun of action from past participle stem of obscurare (see obscure (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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