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obstinate

[ob-stuh-nit] /ˈɒb stə nɪt/
adjective
1.
firmly or stubbornly adhering to one's purpose, opinion, etc.; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty.
2.
characterized by inflexible persistence or an unyielding attitude; inflexibly persisted in or carried out:
obstinate advocacy of high tariffs.
3.
not easily controlled or overcome:
the obstinate growth of weeds.
4.
not yielding readily to treatment, as a disease.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English < Latin obstinātus (past participle of obstināre to set one's mind on, be determined), equivalent to ob- ob- + -stin-, combining form of stan- (derivative of stāre to stand) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
obstinately, adverb
obstinateness, noun
superobstinate, adjective
superobstinately, adverb
superobstinateness, noun
unobstinate, adjective
unobstinately, adverb
Synonyms
1. mulish, obdurate, unyielding, unbending, intractable, perverse, inflexible, refractory, pertinacious. See stubborn.
Antonyms
1. submissive, tractable.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for obstinate
  • Employees grow more obstinate when put back to work under a court decree.
  • Meanwhile, remaining obstinate could do the president more harm than good.
  • He's obstinate and cantankerous, drinks too much and gets too loud when he does.
  • The pagans that remained obstinate, persecuted the monks, and slew two of them.
  • He was bitterly obstinate and prejudiced, and a sincere friend of popular rights.
  • One visitor had come: at any moment another might follow and be more obstinate.
  • But the resistance was so obstinate that the advantage gained did not prove decisive.
  • Despite some moderately obstinate weather, the event was a huge success.
  • It means that you are obstinate in the fact that freedom does not come free.
British Dictionary definitions for obstinate

obstinate

/ˈɒbstɪnɪt/
adjective
1.
adhering fixedly to a particular opinion, attitude, course of action, etc
2.
self-willed or headstrong
3.
difficult to subdue or alleviate; persistent an obstinate fever
Derived Forms
obstinately, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Latin obstinātus, past participle of obstināre to persist in, from ob- (intensive) + stin-, variant of stare to stand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for obstinate
adj.

mid-14c., from Latin obstinatus "resolute, resolved, determined, inflexible, stubborn," past participle of obstinare "persist, stand stubbornly, set one's mind on," from ob "by" (see ob-) + stinare, related to stare "stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet). Related: Obstinately.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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obstinate in Medicine

obstinate ob·sti·nate (ŏb'stə-nĭt)
adj.

  1. Stubbornly adhering to an attitude, an opinion, or a course of action.

  2. Difficult to alleviate or cure.


ob'sti·nate·ness n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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