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obstruct

[uh b-struhkt] /əbˈstrʌkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to block or close up with an obstacle; make difficult to pass:
Debris obstructed the road.
2.
to interrupt, hinder, or oppose the passage, progress, course, etc., of.
3.
to block from sight; to be in the way of (a view, passage, etc.).
Origin
1605-1615
1605-15; < Latin obstructus (past participle of obstruere to build or pile up in the way, bar). See ob-, construct
Related forms
obstructedly, adverb
obstructer, obstructor, noun
obstructingly, adverb
obstructive, adjective
obstructively, adverb
obstructiveness, obstructivity
[ob-struhk-tiv-i-tee] /ˌɒb strʌkˈtɪv ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
noun
nonobstructive, adjective
nonobstructively, adverb
nonobstructiveness, noun
preobstruct, verb (used with object)
unobstructed, adjective
unobstructive, adjective
Synonyms
1. stop, choke, clog, hinder, impede, prevent; check, slow, retard, arrest.
Antonyms
1. encourage, further.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for obstruct
  • Five footbridges on main roads were dynamited to rubble, to obstruct the army's tanks.
  • The formfitting hood stays put and wont obstruct your vision on bike rides or horseback.
  • Low-profile storage is provided underneath the windows so to not obstruct the view.
  • In the view of some educators as well as critics of the education system, those negative feelings obstruct the learning process.
  • Disinformation and distortion obstruct all sensible tax reform.
  • However, these methods obstruct coastal beauty and provide less protection than natural wetlands, which absorb storm surges.
  • Labor leaders have called for a boycott of three delis, saying they exploit workers and obstruct organizing efforts.
  • He will still cheat, and he will certainly try to obstruct the outsiders' view of his skulduggery.
  • The bill forbids people to obstruct vehicle or foot traffic on county roads.
  • It should also give it the resources to crack down on utilities that obstruct access to their high-voltage lines to trade power.
British Dictionary definitions for obstruct

obstruct

/əbˈstrʌkt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to block (a road, passageway, etc) with an obstacle
2.
to make (progress or activity) difficult
3.
to impede or block a clear view of
Derived Forms
obstructor, noun
obstructive, adjective, noun
obstructively, adverb
obstructiveness, noun
Word Origin
C17: Latin obstructus built against, past participle of obstruere, from ob- against + struere to build
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for obstruct
v.

1610s, a back-formation from obstruction or else from Latin obstructus, past participle of obstruere "to block, to stop up" (see obstruction). Related: Obstructed; obstructing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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obstruct in Medicine

obstruct ob·struct (əb-strŭkt', ŏb-)
v. ob·struct·ed, ob·struct·ing, ob·structs
To block or close a body passage so as to hinder or interrupt a flow.


ob·struc'tive adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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