offshore

[awf-shawr, -shohr, of-]
adverb
1.
off or away from the shore: They pushed the boat offshore.
2.
at a distance from the shore, on a body of water: looking for oil offshore.
3.
in a foreign country.
adjective
4.
moving or tending away from the shore toward or into a body of water: an offshore wind.
5.
located or operating on a body of water, at some distance from the shore: offshore fisheries.
6.
registered, located, conducted, or operated in a foreign country: an off-shore investment company; off-shore manufacture of car parts.

Origin:
1710–20; off + shore1

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
offshore (ˌɒfˈʃɔː)
 
adj, —adv
1.  from, away from, or at some distance from the shore
2.  (NZ) overseas; abroad
 
adj
3.  sited or conducted at sea as opposed to on land: offshore industries
4.  based or operating abroad in places where the tax system is more advantageous than that of the home country: offshore banking; offshore fund

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

offshore
1720, from off + shore. Amer.Eng. use for other than the U.S. is from 1948 and the Marshall Plan.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
offshore   (ôf'shôr')  Pronunciation Key 
The relatively flat, irregularly shaped zone that extends outward from the breaker zone to the edge of the continental shelf. The water depth in this area is usually at least 10 m (33 ft). The offshore is continually submerged.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
We drop anchor about a mile offshore from a popular beach.
These same fertilizers are killing offshore waters with runoff.
Thanks to strong offshore breezes, the turbines rotate quite regularly.
Researchers say this longtime bane of offshore drilling is more cost-efficient
  than wind and solar.
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