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offshoring

[awf-shawr-ing, ‐shohr‐, of‐] /ˈɔfˈʃɔr ɪŋ, ‐ˈʃoʊr‐, ˈɒf‐/
noun
1.
the practice of moving employees or certain business activities to foreign countries as a way to lower costs, avoid taxes, etc.:
the offshoring of software jobs to China.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for offshoring
  • Hence, downsizing and offshoring of some noneditorial functions.
  • Between machine learning technology and offshoring it seems to me there will be a big impact on employment in the future.
  • There are even financial and regulatory incentives to offshoring hydrogen generation.
  • But anxiety about offshoring has risen, for three reasons.
  • By and large, the authors shy away from the political hot potato of offshoring.
  • Outsourcing and offshoring are hot political potatoes in rich countries.
  • Unlike manufacturing jobs, natural resource industries aren't susceptible to offshoring when labour costs soar.
  • The who point of offshoring is exactly to cut employee benefits.
  • It seems that during a labor shortage rising wages result in downsizing, offshoring, and other forms of restructuring.
  • Another example is the increased use of offshoring and outsourcing of work.
British Dictionary definitions for offshoring

offshoring

/ˈɒfˌʃɔːrɪŋ/
noun
1.
the practice of moving a company's operating base to a foreign country where labour costs are cheaper
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Contemporary definitions for offshoring
noun

the practice of moving business processes or services to another country, esp. overseas, to reduce costs

Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Copyright © 2003-2014 Dictionary.com, LLC
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Word Origin and History for offshoring
n.

in the economic sense, as a form of outsourcing, attested by 1988, from offshore.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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offshoring in Technology

business
Transfer of a business process, e.g. manufacturing or customer service, from a company in one country to the same or another company in a different country. This overlaps partially with outsourcing, in which work is transferred to a different company in the same or a different country.
(2008-12-12)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Article for offshoring

the practice of outsourcing operations overseas, usually by companies from industrialized countries to less-developed countries, with the intention of reducing the cost of doing business. Chief among the specific reasons for locating operations outside a corporation's home country are lower labour costs, more lenient environmental regulations, less stringent labour regulations, favourable tax conditions, and proximity to raw materials.

Learn more about offshoring with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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