offshoring

[awf-shawr-ing, ‐shohr‐, of]
noun
the practice of moving employees or certain business activities to foreign countries as a way to lower costs, avoid taxes, etc.: the offshoring of software jobs to China.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
offshoring (ˈɒfˌʃɔːrɪŋ)
 
n
the practice of moving a company's operating base to a foreign country where labour costs are cheaper

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  offshoring
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  the practice of moving business processes or services to another country, esp. overseas, to reduce costs
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

offshoring
in the economic sense, as a form of outsourcing, attested by 1988, from offshore.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

offshoring definition

business
Transfer of a business process, e.g. manufacturing or customer service, from a company in one country to the same or another company in a different country. This overlaps partially with outsourcing, in which work is transferred to a different company in the same or a different country.
(2008-12-12)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

offshoring

the practice of outsourcing operations overseas, usually by companies from industrialized countries to less-developed countries, with the intention of reducing the cost of doing business. Chief among the specific reasons for locating operations outside a corporation's home country are lower labour costs, more lenient environmental regulations, less stringent labour regulations, favourable tax conditions, and proximity to raw materials.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Hence, downsizing and offshoring of some noneditorial functions.
But anxiety about offshoring has risen, for three reasons.
By and large, the authors shy away from the political hot potato of offshoring.
Outsourcing and offshoring are hot political potatoes in rich countries.
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