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Denotation vs. Connotation

Ogygian

/əʊˈdʒɪdʒɪən/
adjective
1.
of very great age; prehistoric
Word Origin
C19: from Greek ōgugios relating to Ogyges, the most ancient king of Greece, mythical ruler of Boeotia or Attica
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
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Examples from the Web for ogygian
Historical Examples
  • The ogygian Islands are not far distant from the haven of Sammalo.

  • It must be remembered that it was the ogygian deluge which was said to have been partial and to have inundated Attica.

    Tradition John Francis Arundell
  • Whenever Athens, or any other Greek city, is spoken of with any peculiar reverence, it is called “ogygian.”

  • More sad and more despairing than Ulysses on the ogygian shore, he too wasted away with home-sickness.

    Cord and Creese James de Mille
Word Origin and History for ogygian

Ogygian

adj.

1843, "of great antiquity or age," from Greek Ogygos, name of a mythical Attic or Boeotian king who even in classical times was thought to have lived very long ago. Also sometimes with reference to a famous flood said to have occurred in his day.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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