olingo

olingo

[oh-ling-goh]
noun, plural olingos.
any raccoonlike, nocturnal, fruit-eating mammal of the genus Bassaricyon, inhabiting tropical jungles from Nicaragua to Peru and Bolivia and having large eyes and a long, ringed tail.

Origin:
1915–20; of unexplained orig.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To olingo
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

olingo

(Bassaricyon), any of about four species of small arboreal carnivores of the raccoon family, Procyonidae, found in the jungles of Central and northern South America. Olingos are slender, grayish-brown animals 35-50 centimetres (14-20 inches) long, excluding the bushy, faintly ringed tail, which accounts for an additional 40-50 cm. They have soft fur, pointed muzzles, and rounded ears. They resemble kinkajous but are less stocky and have narrower snouts and longer-haired, nonprehensile tails. Olingos are nocturnal, often travel in small groups, and feed primarily on fruit. Little else is known of their habits

Learn more about olingo with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature