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ominous

[om-uh-nuh s] /ˈɒm ə nəs/
adjective
1.
portending evil or harm; foreboding; threatening; inauspicious:
an ominous bank of dark clouds.
2.
indicating the nature of a future event, for good or evil; having the significance of an omen; being a portent:
Some of these events were immediately ominous, while others only later revealed themselves as such.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; < Latin ōminōsus portentous, equivalent to ōmin- (stem of ōmen) omen + -ōsus -ous
Related forms
ominously, adverb
ominousness, noun
unominous, adjective
unominously, adverb
unominousness, noun
Synonyms
Ominous, portentous, threatening, menacing, fateful are adjectives describing that which forebodes a serious, significant, and often harmful outcome. Ominous, derived from omen “a predictor of outcomes,” usually suggests evil or damaging eventualities: ominous storm clouds; an ominous silence. Portentous, although it may suggest evil results, often stresses a momentous or very important outcome: a portentous moment in history; a portentous escalation of hostilities. Threatening may suggest calamity or great harm but sometimes mere unpleasantness: a threatening rumble from the volcano; A threatening look from his brother caused him to quickly change the subject. Menacing always suggests serious damage as an outcome: a disease menacing the entire population; He advanced with a menacing swagger. Fateful most often stresses the great or decisive importance of what it describes: a fateful encounter between two future leaders; a fateful day that changed our world.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ominous
  • The ominous and foreboding music added to the ridiculous depiction of every day prison life.
  • ominous sounds percolate amid a foreboding swirl of nighttime snow.
  • The official tone of ominous foreboding had been established.
  • Not only is the phrase a bit ominous, it's also a source of confusion.
  • Abstentions in the representative model rarely occur, but when they do, are more ominous.
  • The video features slick animation, an ominous soundtrack, and interviews with indebted students and critical professors.
  • They also indicate something ominous: she might well be dead before she can raise her first litter of pups.
  • Far more ominous are the explosives and weapons illegally entering the kingdom.
  • ominous large boulders the size of cement trucks stood poised above this potential dig.
  • Our attention was immediately drawn to the ominous warning signs of land mines.
British Dictionary definitions for ominous

ominous

/ˈɒmɪnəs/
adjective
1.
foreboding evil
2.
serving as or having significance as an omen
Derived Forms
ominously, adverb
ominousness, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin ōminōsus, from omen
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ominous
adj.

1580s, from Latin ominosus "full of foreboding," from omen (genitive ominis) "foreboding" (see omen). Related: Ominousness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Nearby words for ominous