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Pore Over vs. Pour Over


[wuhn-han-did] /ˈwʌnˈhæn dɪd/
having or using only one hand:
The left fielder made a one-handed catch of the fly ball.
with one hand:
to drive one-handed.
Origin of one-handed
late Middle English
1400-50; late Middle English Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for one-handed
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I have given my hands to the one-handed, my legs to the lame, my eyes to the blind; I have cut off my head for the decapitated.

    The Temptation of St. Antony Gustave Flaubert
  • Wolf Paw slid down from his horse and, one-handed, untied Nancy.

    Shaman Robert Shea
  • Like the Greeks, they fought with the one-handed pike and shield.

    The Anabasis of Alexander Arrian of Nicomedia
  • one-handed, with a single thrust, he picked Jason off the ground and sent him hurtling under the living arch.

    Deathworld Harry Harrison
  • Scruple is one-handed when a sceptre is to be seized, and a eunuch when fortune is to be wedded.

    The Man Who Laughs Victor Hugo
  • Only a one-handed weapon can be used in such a place, so they invented the harpoon and the bird dart.

    Our Little Eskimo Cousin Mary Hazleton Wade
  • Garm, the hell-hound, shall fasten upon the one-handed Tyr, and each shall kill the other.

    Evolution in Art Alfred C. Haddon
  • A one-handed catch, wide on his left side, made the welkin ring with applause.

    Helena's Path Anthony Hope
  • The downward and outward force of the blow jerked loose Cochise's one-handed grip on the ladder.

    Bloom of Cactus Robert Ames Bennet

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