onerous

[on-er-uhs, oh-ner-]
adjective
1.
burdensome, oppressive, or troublesome; causing hardship: onerous duties.
2.
having or involving obligations or responsibilities, especially legal ones, that outweigh the advantages: an onerous agreement.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin onerōsus, equivalent to oner- (stem of onus) burden + -ōsus -ous

onerously, adverb
onerousness, onerosity [oh-nuh-ros-i-tee] , noun
nononerous, adjective
nononerously, adverb
nononerousness, noun
unonerous, adjective
unonerously, adverb
unonerousness, noun


1. heavy, crushing, grievous; irksome, galling.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To onerous
Collins
World English Dictionary
onerous (ˈɒnərəs, ˈəʊ-)
 
adj
1.  laborious or oppressive
2.  law (of a contract, lease, etc) having or involving burdens or obligations that counterbalance or outweigh the advantages
 
[C14: from Latin onerōsus burdensome, from onus load]
 
'onerously
 
adv
 
'onerousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

onerous
c.1400, from O.Fr. (h)onereus (14c., Mod.Fr. onéreux), from L. onerosus, from onus (gen. oneris) "burden."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
There are other powers, too, that could perform this grateful but onerous
  duty-Times.
Rather than the onerous demands put upon them today.
Or it can go in and have to obey the onerous requests.
As for the rest, in a normal interest rate environment, this would be onerous.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;