onus

[oh-nuhs]

Origin:
1630–40; < Latin: load, burden


1. responsibility, weight, duty, load.
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onus probandi

[oh-noos proh-bahn-dee; English oh-nuhs proh-ban-dahy, -dee]
Latin.
the burden of proof.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
onus (ˈəʊnəs)
 
n , pl onuses
a responsibility, task, or burden
 
[C17: from Latin: burden]

onus probandi (ˈəʊnəs prəʊˈbændɪ)
 
n
law the Latin phrase for burden of proof

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

onus
c.1640, from L. onus (gen. oneris) "load, burden." Hence legal L. onus probandi (1722), lit. "burden of proving."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The onus isn't on his detractors to prove that this stunt was a really, really
  bad decision.
The onus is on faculty to make sure the student further develops the work in
  ways that show growth.
Yes, caveat emptor applies, ie there is an onus on the buyer to understand what
  they are doing with their data.
Meal choices had been filed online beforehand, eliminating the ordering onus.
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