opium

[oh-pee-uhm]
noun
1.
the dried, condensed juice of a poppy, Papaver somniferum, that has a narcotic, soporific, analgesic, and astringent effect and contains morphine, codeine, papaverine, and other alkaloids used in medicine in their isolated or derived forms: a narcotic substance, poisonous in large doses.
2.
anything that causes dullness or inaction or that soothes the mind or emotions.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek ópion poppy juice, equivalent to op(ós) sap, juice + -ion diminutive suffix

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World English Dictionary
opium (ˈəʊpɪəm)
 
n
1.  the dried juice extracted from the unripe seed capsules of the opium poppy that contains alkaloids such as morphine and codeine: used in medicine as an analgesic
2.  something having a tranquillizing or stupefying effect
 
[C14: from Latin: poppy juice, from Greek opion, diminutive of opos juice of a plant]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

opium
late 14c., from L. opium, from Gk. opion "poppy juice, poppy," dim. of opos "vegetable juice."
"Die Religion ist der Seufzer der bedrängten Kreatur, das Gemüth einer herzlosen Welt, wie sie der Geist geistloser Zustände ist. Sie ist das Opium des Volks." [Karl Marx, "Zur Kritik der Hegel'schen Rechts-Philosophie," in "Deutsch-Französische Jahrbücher," February, 1844]
The British Opium War against China lasted from 1839-42; the name is attested from 1841.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

opium o·pi·um (ō'pē-əm)
n.
A bitter, yellowish-brown, strongly addictive narcotic drug prepared from the dried juice of unripe pods of the opium poppy and containing alkaloids such as morphine, codeine, and papaverine. Also called meconium.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
opium   (ō'pē-əm)  Pronunciation Key 
A highly addictive, yellowish-brown drug obtained from the pods of a variety of poppy, from which other drugs, such as morphine, are prepared.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

opium definition


A highly addictive drug obtained from the poppy plant. Several other drugs, such as morphine and codeine, are derived from opium.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
The effect of habitual opium taking on health and longevity, has been a subject
  of legal consideration.
In fact, many warlords are focusing on so-called import-exports, including
  opium trafficking.
No, this isn't another attempt to fight corruption and opium with agricultural
  alternatives.
Opium has the chill factor of pop, but a total body high.
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