oracular

[aw-rak-yuh-ler, oh-rak-]
adjective
1.
of the nature of, resembling, or suggesting an oracle: an oracular response.
2.
giving forth utterances or decisions as if by special inspiration or authority.
3.
uttered or delivered as if divinely inspired or infallible; sententious.
4.
ambiguous; obscure.
5.
portentous; ominous.

Origin:
1625–35; < Latin ōrācul(um) oracle + -ar1

oracularly, adverb
oracularity [aw-rak-yuh-lar-i-tee, oh-rak-] , oracularness, noun


1. prophetic. 2. authoritative, dogmatic. 4. equivocal.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
oracular (ɒˈrækjʊlə)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to an oracle: Apollo had his oracular shrine at Delphi
2.  wise and prophetic: an oracular political thriller
3.  mysterious or ambiguous
 
o'racularly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

oracular
1670s, from L. oraculum (see oracle).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Oracular wisdom seems to be the common tongue up in the mountains.
In some instances well undoubtedly come to understand the oracular equations
  our software produces.
These things are seen with the naturalist's clear grave eyes and recorded in
  plain words with no attempt at oracular profundity.
They amount to oracular experiments in graphic semiotics.
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