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organize

[awr-guh-nahyz] /ˈɔr gəˌnaɪz/
verb (used with object), organized, organizing.
1.
to form as or into a whole consisting of interdependent or coordinated parts, especially for united action:
to organize a committee.
2.
to systematize:
to organize the files of an office.
3.
to give organic structure or character to:
to organize the elements of a composition.
4.
to enlist or attempt to enlist into a labor union:
to organize workers.
5.
to enlist the employees of (a company) into a labor union; unionize:
to organize a factory.
6.
Informal. to put (oneself) in a state of mental competence to perform a task:
We can't have any slip-ups, so you'd better get organized.
verb (used without object), organized, organizing.
7.
to combine in an organized company, party, or the like.
8.
to form a labor union:
Management resisted all efforts to organize.
9.
to assume organic structure.
Also, especially British, organise.
Origin of organize
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Medieval Latin organizāre to contrive, arrange = organ(um) organ + -izāre -ize
Related forms
organizable, adjective
organizability, noun
misorganize, verb, misorganized, misorganizing.
outorganize, verb (used with object), outorganized, outorganizing.
preorganize, verb, preorganized, preorganizing.
unorganizable, adjective
Synonyms
1. dispose, frame. 2. order.
Antonyms
1. destroy.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for organize
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The first difficulty the committee found was to organize a government without an executive.

    A History of Oregon, 1792-1849 William Henry Gray
  • A bill was brought into Congress to permit Missouri to organize as a State.

    The Negro and the Nation George S. Merriam
  • But if we wish to acquire and organize facts for their permanent value, cramming is not the proper procedure.

    The Science of Human Nature William Henry Pyle
  • To scheme, to plot, to organize against the authority of the moment was in their blood.

    The White Mice Richard Harding Davis
  • So they saw fit to organize what they called a general athletic association.

    At Good Old Siwash George Fitch
British Dictionary definitions for organize

organize

/ˈɔːɡəˌnaɪz/
verb
1.
to form (parts or elements of something) into a structured whole; coordinate
2.
(transitive) to arrange methodically or in order
3.
(transitive) to provide with an organic structure
4.
(transitive) to enlist (the workers) of (a factory, concern, or industry) in a trade union
5.
(intransitive) to join or form an organization or trade union
6.
(transitive) (informal) to put (oneself) in an alert and responsible frame of mind
Word Origin
C15: from Medieval Latin organizare, from Latin organumorgan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for organize
v.

early 15c., "construct, establish," from Middle French organiser and directly from Medieval Latin organizare, from Latin organum "instrument, organ" (see organ). Related: Organized; organizing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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organize in Medicine

organize or·gan·ize (ôr'gə-nīz')
v. or·gan·ized, or·gan·iz·ing, or·gan·iz·es

  1. To put together into an orderly, functional, structured whole.

  2. To arrange in a coherent form.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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