orthography

[awr-thog-ruh-fee]
noun, plural orthographies for 3–5.
1.
the art of writing words with the proper letters, according to accepted usage; correct spelling.
2.
the part of language study concerned with letters and spelling.
3.
a method of spelling, as by the use of an alphabet or other system of symbols; spelling.
4.
a system of such symbols: Missionaries provided the first orthography for the language.
5.
an orthographic projection, or an elevation drawn by means of it.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English ortografye < Latin orthographia correct writing, orthogonal projection < Greek orthographía. See ortho-, -graphy

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World English Dictionary
orthography (ɔːˈθɒɡrəfɪ)
 
n , pl -phies
1.  a writing system
2.  a.  spelling considered to be correct
 b.  the principles underlying spelling
3.  the study of spelling
4.  orthographic projection
 
or'thographer
 
n
 
or'thographist
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

orthography
"correct or proper spelling," c.1450, from M.Fr. orthographie (O.Fr. ortografie, 13c.), from L. orthographia, from Gk. orthos "correct" (see ortho-) + root of graphein "to write."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Orthography and speech are different notions in many important ways, yet it is
  easy for us to conflate them.
And he certainly practices what he preaches in terms of orthography.
And you don't need to take a course on orthography to appreciate that.
Variants of this orthography allow for easier computer typesetting.
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