ozonide

[oh-zuh-nahyd, oh-zoh-]
noun Chemistry.
any compound, usually explosive, formed by the addition of ozone to the double or triple bond of an organic compound.

Origin:
1865–70; ozon- + -ide

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ozonide (əʊˈzəʊnaɪd)
 
n
any of a class of unstable explosive compounds produced by the addition of ozone to a double bond in an organic compound

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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ozonide

any of a class of chemical compounds formed by reactions of ozone (q.v.) with other compounds. Organic ozonides, often made from olefins (q.v.), are unstable, most of them decomposing rapidly into oxygen compounds, such as aldehydes, ketones, and peroxides, or reacting rapidly with oxidizing or reducing agents. A few inorganic ozonides are known, containing the negatively charged ion O-3; an example is potassium ozonide (KO3), an unstable, orange-red solid formed from potassium hydroxide and ozone that, upon heating, decomposes into oxygen and potassium superoxide (KO2).

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
May also form an ozonide which is explosive at ambient temperatures.
Forms explosive vinyl acetate ozonide on contact with ozone.
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