Paducah

Paducah

[puh-doo-kuh, -dyoo-]
noun
a city in W Kentucky, at the junction of the Tennessee and Ohio rivers.
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paducah

city, seat of McCracken county, southwestern Kentucky, U.S., at the confluence of the Ohio (there bridged to Brookport, Illinois) and Tennessee rivers. The site, known as Pekin, was part of a grant to soldier and frontiersman George Rogers Clark. At his death his brother William, who was coleader of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, received the land, laid out the town in 1827, and named it for Paduke, a Chickasaw Indian chief who lived in the vicinity. During the American Civil War, because of its strategic river facilities, the city was occupied by Union forces under General Ulysses S. Grant and was raided by General Nathan B. Forrest, a Confederate cavalry leader. Severe floods in 1884, 1913, and 1937 prompted construction of a flood wall and dams on the Tennessee, Ohio, and Cumberland rivers.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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