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pall-mall

[pel-mel, pal-mal, pawl-mawl] /ˈpɛlˈmɛl, ˈpælˈmæl, ˈpɔlˈmɔl/
noun
1.
a game, popular in the 17th century, in which a ball of boxwood was struck with a mallet in an attempt to drive it through a raised iron ring at the end of a playing alley.
2.
a playing alley on which this game was played.
Origin
1560-1570
1560-70; < Middle French pallemaille < Italian pallamaglio, equivalent to palla ball (< Langobardic) + maglio mallet (< Latin malleus). See ball1, mall, mell
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for pall-mall

pall-mall

/ˈpælˈmæl/
noun (obsolete)
1.
a game in which a ball is driven by a mallet along an alley and through an iron ring
2.
the alley itself
Word Origin
C17: from obsolete French, from Italian pallamaglio, from palla ball + maglio mallet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for pall-mall

see mall.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for pall-mall

paille-maille

(from Italian pallamaglio, palla, "ball," and maglio, "mallet"), obsolete game of French origin, resembling croquet. An English traveler in France mentions it early in the 17th century, and it was introduced into England in the second quarter of that century. Thomas Blount's Glossographia (1656) described it as "a game wherein a round bowle is with a mallet struck through a high arch of iron (standing at either end of an alley) which he that can do at the fewest blows, or at the number agreed on, wins. This game was heretofore used in the long alley near St. James's and vulgarly called Pell-Mell." The pronunciation here described as vulgar afterward became classic, a famous London street having been named after a pall-mall alley. A mallet and balls used in the game were found in 1845 and are now in the British Museum: the mallet resembles that used in croquet, but its head is curved; the balls are of boxwood and about one foot in circumference. The 17th-century diarist Samuel Pepys described the alley as of hard sand "dressed with powdered cockle-shells." The length of the alley varies, the one at St. James being close to 800 yards long.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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