pamphlet

[pam-flit]
noun
1.
a complete publication of generally less than 80 pages stitched or stapled together and usually having a paper cover.
2.
a short treatise or essay, generally a controversial tract, on some subject of contemporary interest: a political pamphlet.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English pamflet < Anglo-Latin panfletus, pamfletus, syncopated variant of Pamphiletus, diminutive of Medieval Latin Pamphilus, title of a 12th-century Latin comedy. See -et

pamphletary, adjective
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World English Dictionary
pamphlet (ˈpæmflɪt)
 
n
1.  a brief publication generally having a paper cover; booklet
2.  a brief treatise, often on a subject of current interest, published in pamphlet form
 
[C14 pamflet, from Anglo-Latin panfletus, from Medieval Latin Pamphilus title of a popular 12th-century amatory poem from Greek Pamphilos masculine proper name]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pamphlet
"small, unbound treatise," late 14c., from Anglo-Latin panfletus, popular short form of "Pamphilus, seu de Amore" ("Pamphilus, or about Love"), a short L. love poem of 12c., popular and widely copied in Middle Ages; the name from Gk. pamphilos "loved by all," from pan- "all" + philos "loving, dear."
Meaning "brief work dealing with questions of current interest" is late 16c. Pamphleteer (n.) is first recorded 1640s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Make an educational pamphlet for teens that describes the dangers of
  dehydration.
The pamphlet has certainly been taken seriously abroad.
He suggested that this kind of technology could even be used to shrink the
  world's collection of books onto one pamphlet.
The county's many private access roads are often in bad shape, the pamphlet
  says.
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