parry

[par-ee]
verb (used with object), parried, parrying.
1.
to ward off (a thrust, stroke, weapon, etc.), as in fencing; avert.
2.
to turn aside; evade or dodge: to parry an embarrassing question.
verb (used without object), parried, parrying.
3.
to parry a thrust, blow, etc.
noun, plural parries.
4.
an act or instance of parrying, as in fencing.
5.
a defensive movement in fencing.

Origin:
1665–75; < French parez, imperative of parer to ward off, set off < Latin parāre to set. See parade

parriable, adjective
parrier, noun
unparried, adjective
unparrying, adjective


2. avert; elude; prevent, obviate, preclude.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Parry

[par-ee]
noun
1.
Milman, 1902–35, U.S. classical scholar and philologist.
2.
William Edward, 1790–1855, English arctic explorer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
parry (ˈpærɪ)
 
vb , -ries, -rying, -ried
1.  to ward off (an attack) by blocking or deflecting, as in fencing
2.  (tr) to evade (questions), esp adroitly
 
n , -ries, -rying, -ried, -ries
3.  an act of parrying, esp (in fencing) using a stroke or circular motion of the blade
4.  a skilful evasion, as of a question
 
[C17: from French parer to ward off, from Latin parāre to prepare]

Parry (ˈpærɪ)
 
n
1.  Sir (Charles) Hubert (Hastings). 1848--1918, English composer, noted esp for his choral works
2.  Sir William Edward. 1790--1855, English arctic explorer, who searched for the Northwest Passage (1819--25) and attempted to reach the North Pole (1827)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

parry
1634, from Fr. parez! (which commonly would have been heard in fencing lessons), imper. of parer "ward off," from It. parare "to ward or defend a blow," from L. parare "make ready, prepare" (see pare). Non-fencing use is from 1718.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Currency boards can help countries parry attacks on their currencies.
If he cannot explain complex issues clearly, or parry reporters' thrusts, he does his boss a disservice.
In this febrile atmosphere, our two debaters have engaged in a final thrust and parry.
Parry describes that keeps customers on the property.
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