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patrol

[puh-trohl] /pəˈtroʊl/
verb (used without object), patrolled, patrolling.
1.
(of a police officer, soldier, etc.) to pass along a road, beat, etc., or around or through a specified area in order to maintain order and security.
verb (used with object), patrolled, patrolling.
2.
to maintain the order and security of (a road, beat, area, etc.) by passing along or through it.
noun
3.
a person or group of persons assigned to patrol an area, road, etc.
4.
an automobile, ship, plane, squadron, fleet, etc., assigned to patrol an area.
5.
Military. a detachment of two or more persons, often a squad or platoon, detailed for reconnaissance or combat.
6.
the act of patrolling.
8.
(in the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts) a subdivision of a troop, usually consisting of about eight members.
Origin
1655-1665
1655-65; < French patrouille (noun), patrouiller (v.) patrol, originally a pawing (noun), to paw (v.) in mud; derivative (with suffixal -ouille) of patte paw; -r- unexplained
Related forms
patroller, noun
repatrol, verb (used with object), repatrolled, repatrolling.
unpatrolled, adjective
well-patrolled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for patrolling
  • patrolling and monitoring of the big cats' movements within the region has been stepped up.
  • Stokes also helps sites target interventions, including better patrolling and improved law enforcement.
  • Obedient but with a wild streak, the sled dogs are actually eager to be harnessed and start patrolling.
  • Strange bear behavior sends the wardens patrolling for clues about bear activity.
  • patrolling officers had stumbled across the hidden amphitheater, fully equipped for movie screenings.
  • Leopard seals are out there waiting, hunting, patrolling for the slow and unwary.
  • Follow one of the toughest law enforcement agencies in the nation, patrolling alone on unforgiving terrains.
  • They do this work at night, patrolling gill nets from sundown until sunup.
  • These animals are simply patrolling their range, but interaction with people can be deadly.
  • It has a slightly damaged wing, but it seems to be boldly patrolling the canoe and shooing away the curious.
British Dictionary definitions for patrolling

patrol

/pəˈtrəʊl/
noun
1.
the action of going through or around a town, neighbourhood, etc, at regular intervals for purposes of security or observation
2.
a person or group that carries out such an action
3.
a military detachment with the mission of security, gathering information, or combat with enemy forces
4.
a division of a troop of Scouts or Guides
verb -trols, -trolling, -trolled
5.
to engage in a patrol of (a place)
Derived Forms
patroller, noun
Word Origin
C17: from French patrouiller, from patouiller to flounder in mud, from patte paw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for patrolling

patrol

n.

1660s, "action of going the rounds" (of a military camp, etc.), from French patrouille "a night watch" (1530s), from patrouiller "go the rounds to watch or guard," originally "tramp through the mud," probably soldiers' slang, from Old French patouiller "paddle in water," probably from pate "paw, foot" (see patten). Compare paddlefoot, World War II U.S. Army slang for "infantry soldier." Meaning "those who go on a patrol" is from 1660s. Sense of "detachment of soldiers sent out to scout the countryside, the enemy, etc." is attested from 1702.

v.

1690s, from patrol (n.) and in part from French patrouiller. Related: Patrolled; patrolling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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