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pelvis

[pel-vis] /ˈpɛl vɪs/
noun, plural pelvises, pelves
[pel-veez] /ˈpɛl viz/ (Show IPA).
Anatomy, Zoology
1.
the basinlike cavity in the lower part of the trunk of many vertebrates, formed in humans by the innominate bones, sacrum, etc.
2.
the bones forming this cavity.
3.
the cavity of the kidney that receives the urine before it is passed into the ureter.
Origin
1605-1615
1605-15; < Neo-Latin; Latin: basin; akin to Greek pellís bowl
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for pelvis
  • Also, there is another triceratops pelvis with parts ripped off, indicating t rex ate all that it got it's mouth around.
  • The research is based on a dinosaur pelvis that contains a single pair of shelled eggs inside the body cavity.
  • The pelvis decoupled from the spine, allowing the tail a broader range of vertical motion.
  • Fragments of a silk handkerchief were found next to the pelvis of one of the sailors in the turret.
  • She crushed him with her head, pressing him to the ground and fracturing his pelvis in five places as well as slashing his thigh.
  • She broke her pelvis and her arm, and her spleen was ruptured.
  • Stretching from rib cage to pelvis, the spleen filled half his abdomen.
  • You've got a leg on either side and a pelvis directly above.
  • The renal pelvis, wide above and narrow below where it joins the ureter, is partly outside the renal sinus.
  • There is a suspected broken bone in the hip, pelvis, or upper leg.
British Dictionary definitions for pelvis

pelvis

/ˈpɛlvɪs/
noun (pl) -vises, -ves (-viːz)
1.
the large funnel-shaped structure at the lower end of the trunk of most vertebrates: in man it is formed by the hipbones and sacrum
2.
the bones that form this structure
3.
any anatomical cavity or structure shaped like a funnel or cup
4.
short for renal pelvis
Word Origin
C17: from Latin: basin, laver
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pelvis
n.

1610s, "basin-like cavity formed by the bones of the pelvic girdle," from Modern Latin, from Latin pelvis "basin, laver," Old Latin peluis "basin," from PIE *pel- "container" (cf. Sanskrit palavi "vessel," Greek pelex "helmet," pelike "goblet, bowl," Old Norse and Old English full "cup").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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pelvis in Medicine

pelvis pel·vis (pěl'vĭs)
n. pl. pel·vis·es or pel·ves (-vēz)

  1. A basin-shaped structure of the vertebrate skeleton, composed of the innominate bones on the sides, the pubis in front, and the sacrum and coccyx behind, that rests on the lower limbs and supports the spinal column.

  2. The cavity formed by this structure.

  3. A basinlike or cup-shaped anatomical cavity.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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pelvis in Science
pelvis
  (pěl'vĭs)   
Plural pelvises or pelves (pěl'vēz)
The basin-shaped structure in vertebrate animals that joins the spine and lower or hind limbs. In primates, the pelvis is composed of the two hipbones joined to the sacrum. It contains, protects, and supports the intestines, bladder, and internal reproductive organs.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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pelvis in Culture

pelvis definition


The bowl-shaped group of bones connecting the trunk of the body to the legs and supporting the spine. The pelvis includes the hip bones and the lower part of the backbone.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for pelvis

in human anatomy, basin-shaped complex of bones that connects the trunk and legs, supports and balances the trunk, and contains and supports the intestines, urinary bladder, and internal sex organs. The pelvic girdle consists of paired hipbones, connected in front at the pubic symphysis and behind by the sacrum; each is made up of three bones-the blade-shaped ilium, above and to either side, which accounts for the width of the hips; the ischium, behind and below, on which the weight falls in sitting; and the pubis, in front. All three unite in early adulthood at a triangular suture in the acetabulum, the cup-shaped socket that forms the hip joint with the head of the femur (thighbone). The ring made by the pelvic girdle functions as the birth canal in females. The pelvis provides attachment for muscles that balance and support the trunk and move the legs, hips, and trunk. In the infant the pelvis is narrow and nonsupportive. As the child begins walking, the pelvis broadens and tilts, the sacrum descends deeper into its articulation with the ilia, and the lumbar curve develops.

Learn more about pelvis with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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