plano

plano

[pley-noh]
adjective
pertaining to eyeglasses that do not contain a curvature for correcting vision defects: plano sunglasses.

Origin:
1945–50; independent use of plano-1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Plano

[pley-noh]
noun
a town in N Texas.

plano-

1
a combining form meaning “flat,” “plane,” used in the formation of compound words: planography.
Also, plani-; especially before a vowel, plan-.


Origin:
combining form representing Latin plānus level, plānum level ground

plano-

2
a combining form meaning “moving,” “capable of movement,” used in the formation of compound words: planogamete.

Origin:
combining form representing Greek plános wandering, roaming. See planet

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
plano- or (sometimes before a vowel) plan-
 
combining form
indicating flatness or planeness: plano-concave
 
[from Latin plānus flat, level]
 
plan- or (sometimes before a vowel) plan-
 
combining form
 
[from Latin plānus flat, level]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

plano- or plani- or plan-
pref.
Flat: planocellular.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

plano

city, Collin and Denton counties, northern Texas, U.S., located about 16 miles (26 km) northeast of Dallas. It is situated in a region of blackland prairie and was first settled (1845-46) by a group called Peters' Colony (named for William S. Peters, who had led investors in gaining land grants from the Republic of Texas in the early 1840s). The community was granted a post office in 1851; several names were proposed, and ultimately Plano-which a leading citizen understood to be the Spanish word meaning "plain," an apt description of the terrain-was selected. The railroad reached Plano in 1872, and, although the town was almost destroyed by fire in 1881, it continued to develop as a small agricultural centre in the midst of a cotton-producing and cattle-raising area. Plano's rapid population growth began in the 1960s, when the population was less than 4,000, a result of the expansion of the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Plano is a financial and commercial centre, and its manufactures include compact discs, printed materials, metals, satellite communication equipment, and bakery equipment. Plano is the headquarters of Frito-Lay, a division of Pepsico. Heritage Farmstead Museum occupies a former sheep ranch. Plano, considered the "Balloon Capital of Texas," hosts a popular hot-air balloon festival each September. Inc. 1873. Pop. (1990) 128,713; (2000) 222,030.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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