Podunk

Podunk

[poh-duhngk]
noun
any small and insignificant or inaccessible town or village: After a year in the big city, I was ready to move back to Podunk.

Origin:
1660–70, Americanism; generic use of Podunk, village near Hartford, Conn.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Podunk
"legendary small town," 1846, originally the name of a small group of Indians who lived around the Podunk River in Connecticut; the tribe name is in colonial records from 1656 (as Potunck), from southern New England Algonquian (Mohegan or Massachusetts) Potunk, perhaps an alteration of ptukohke "neck,
corner of land;" or, on another authority, from pautaunke, from pot- "to sink" + locative suffix -unk, thus "a boggy place." Its popularity as the name of a typical (if mythical) U.S. small town dates from a series of witty "Letters from Podunk" which ran in the "Buffalo Daily National Pilot" newspaper beginning Jan. 5, 1846.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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