poetic license

noun
license or liberty taken by a poet, prose writer, or other artist in deviating from rule, conventional form, logic, or fact, in order to produce a desired effect.

Origin:
1780–90

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  poetic license
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  See artistic license
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

poetic license

Also, artistic license. The liberty taken by a writer or artist in deviating from conventional form or fact to achieve an effect. For example, I've never seen grass or a tree of that color; but that's artistic license. [Late 1700s]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

poetic license

the right assumed by poets to alter or invert standard syntax or depart from common diction or pronunciation to comply with the metrical or tonal requirements of their writing.

Learn more about poetic license with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
It's all a matter of poetic license, but then this is supposed to be science.
The illustrator took the artist's poetic license one step further.
Students can discuss the way in which specific details of the event may give way to poetic license.
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