follow Dictionary.com

Stories We Like: Novels For Language Lovers

polyphonic

[pol-ee-fon-ik] /ˌpɒl iˈfɒn ɪk/
adjective
1.
consisting of many voices or sounds.
2.
Music.
  1. having two or more voices or parts, each with an independent melody, but all harmonizing; contrapuntal (opposed to homophonic).
  2. pertaining to music of this kind.
  3. capable of producing more than one tone at a time, as an organ or a harp.
3.
Phonetics. having more than one phonetic value, as the letter s, that is voiced (z) in nose and unvoiced (s) in salt.
Origin
1775-1785
1775-85; polyphone + -ic
Related forms
polyphonically, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for polyphonic
  • The polyphonic narrative now transfers its center of gravity with grace and elegance.
  • Elements of the high polyphonic tradition run through his work.
  • polyphonic is a forum that unifies emcees, instrumentalists and poets.
  • Each group has one music book, suggesting that their singing is antiphonal and polyphonic.
  • Identify monophonic, homophonic, and polyphonic textures.
British Dictionary definitions for polyphonic

polyphonic

/ˌpɒlɪˈfɒnɪk/
adjective
1.
(music) composed of relatively independent melodic lines or parts; contrapuntal
2.
many-voiced
3.
(phonetics) of, relating to, or denoting a polyphone
Derived Forms
polyphonically, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for polyphonic
adj.

1782, formed in English from Greek polyphonos (see polyphony).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for polyphonic

22
0
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with polyphonic