polywater

polywater

[pol-ee-waw-ter, -wot-er]
noun Chemistry.
a subtance mistakenly identified as a polymeric form of water, now known to be water containing ions from glass or quartz.

Origin:
1965–70; poly(meric) + water

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
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polywater

liquid water generally formed by condensation of water vapour in tiny glass or fused-quartz capillaries and with properties very different from those well established for ordinary water; e.g., lower vapour pressure, lower freezing temperature, higher density and viscosity, higher thermal stability, and different infrared and Raman spectra. For a few years after the announcement of the discovery of the substance (1968) by a group of Soviet scientists, many investigators held the view that the substance was a new form of water, possibly a polymer. In the 1970s thorough study established that anomalous water is ordinary water containing ionic contaminants that cause it to have the unusual properties.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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