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[pon-choh] /ˈpɒn tʃoʊ/
noun, plural ponchos.
a blanketlike cloak with a hole in the center to admit the head, originating in South America, now often worn as a raincoat.
Origin of poncho
1710-20; < American Spanish < Araucanian
Related forms
ponchoed, adjective Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for poncho
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • In our case, however, the poncho will protect the shirt from a wetting.

    Packing and Portaging Dillon Wallace
  • It had the appearance of a short fellow in a poncho and a big hat.

    A Set of Six Joseph Conrad
  • Bloom, parting them swiftly, draws his caliph's hood and poncho and hurries down the steps with sideways face.

    Ulysses James Joyce
  • I shall spread my poncho and blanket on the ground presently.

  • When thus equipped the rubber blanket is known as a poncho, and is most useful because it can be used for two purposes.

    Camp and Trail Stewart Edward White
British Dictionary definitions for poncho


noun (pl) -chos
a cloak of a kind originally worn in South America, made of a rectangular or circular piece of cloth, esp wool, with a hole in the middle to put the head through
Word Origin
C18: from American Spanish, from Araucanian pantho woollen material
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for poncho

type of blanket-like South American cloak, 1717, from American Spanish poncho, from Araucanian (Chile) pontho "woolen fabric," perhaps influenced by Spanish poncho (adj.), variant of pocho "discolored, faded."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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