follow Dictionary.com

It’s about time. We are now on Instagram!

ponder

[pon-der] /ˈpɒn dər/
verb (used without object)
1.
to consider something deeply and thoroughly; meditate (often followed by over or upon).
verb (used with object)
2.
to weigh carefully in the mind; consider thoughtfully:
He pondered his next words thoroughly.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English pondren < Middle French ponderer < Latin ponderāre to ponder, weigh; akin to pendēre to be suspended, hang (see pend)
Related forms
ponderer, noun
reponder, verb (used without object)
unpondered, adjective
well-pondered, adjective
Synonyms
1. reflect, cogitate, deliberate, ruminate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for ponder
  • Open-minded readers will enjoy her beautifully written book as an opportunity to ponder our shared humanity.
  • The visitor is left to ponder if perhaps these two women are actually one.
  • As he plumbed the details, he found more and more to admire and ponder.
  • He looks forward to the chance to read, chat and ponder on the boat.
  • Scholars and archaeologists still ponder why they left.
  • Philosophers ponder what happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object.
  • That is something to ponder while stuck in the Delhi traffic.
  • It turns out that the pigments and dyes responsible for hues have many remarkable characteristics, most of which we rarely ponder.
  • They will ponder their plans for the future.
  • And this was a show to savor for its outward prettiness and to ponder for its interior vision.
British Dictionary definitions for ponder

ponder

/ˈpɒndə/
verb
1.
when intr, sometimes foll by on or over. to give thorough or deep consideration (to); meditate (upon)
Word Origin
C14: from Old French ponderer, from Latin ponderāre to weigh, consider, from pondus weight; related to pendere to weigh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for ponder
v.

early 14c., "to estimate the worth of, to appraise," from Old French ponderer "to weigh, poise" (14c., Modern French pondérer) and directly from Latin ponderare "ponder, consider, reflect," literally "to weigh," from pondus (genitive ponderis) "weigh" (see pound (n.1)). Meaning "to weigh a matter mentally" is attested from late 14c. Related: Pondered; pondering; ponderation.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
ponder in Technology

A non-strict polymorphic, functional language by Jon Fairbairn .
Ponder's type system is unusual. It is more powerful than the Hindley-Milner type system used by ML and Miranda and extended by Haskell. Ponder adds extra recursive 'mu' types to those of Girard's System F, allowing more general recursion. Surprisingly, the type system and type inference algorithm are still not completely understood.
["Ponder and its Type System", J. Fairbairn, TR 31, Cambridge U Computer Lab, Nov 1982].
[J. Fairbairn, "Design and Implementation of a Simple Typed Language based on the Lambda-Calculus", Technical Report No. 75, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, May 1985].
[J. Fairbairn, "A New Type-Checker for a Functional Language", Technical Report No. 53, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1984].
[J. Fairbairn, "Some Types with Inclusion Properties in \forall, \rightarrow, \mu", Technical Report No. 171, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Jun 1989].
[Valeria C. V. de Paiva, "Subtyping in Ponder (Preliminary Report)", Technical Report No. 203, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Aug 1990].
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for ponder

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for ponder

9
11
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with ponder

Nearby words for ponder