pooh

1 [poo, poo]

Origin:
1595–1605

Dictionary.com Unabridged

pooh

2 [poo]
verb (used with object)
poop4.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
pooh (puː)
 
interj
1.  an exclamation of disdain, contempt, or disgust
 
n
2.  a childish word for faeces
 
vb
3.  a childish word for defecate

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pooh
1593, "a 'vocal gesture' expressing the action of puffing anything away" [OED], first attested in Hamlet Act I, Scene III, where Polonius addresses Ophelia with, "Affection! pooh! you speak like a green girl, / Unsifted in such perilous circumstance. / Do you believe his tenders, as you call them?"
But the "vocal gesture" is perhaps ancient. Among the many 19th century theories of the origin of language was the Pooh-pooh theory (1860), which held that language grew from natural expressions of surprise, joy, pain, or grief. The slang reduplicated verb pooh-pooh "to dismiss lightly and contemptuously" is attested from 1827. Pooh as baby-talk for "excrement" is from 1950s (cf. poop (n.2)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The human brain seems to be built to pooh-pooh human pheromones.
The moral: cern-style science for science's sake is not to be pooh-poohed, even
  when it seems impossibly arcane.
But it still looks odd that green lobbyists were so quick to pooh-pooh the
  decision to get rid of subsidies.
Still, modern designers of light-displacement boats often pooh-pooh the sturdy
  qualities of traditional boats.
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