postage

[poh-stij] /ˈpoʊ stɪdʒ/
noun
1.
the charge for the conveyance of a letter or other matter sent by mail, usually prepaid by means of a stamp or stamps.
Origin
1580–90; post3 + -age
Example Sentences for postage
Lignins are especially ideal for pressure-sensitive adhesives such as those used on tape, postage stamps, and name tags.
The law also prevents the post office from raising postage fees faster than inflation.
But those didn't even offset the cost of postage, and the editor's salary was needed to pay for teaching instead.
For example, explain that your postage costs are high because you will be conducting a mail survey.
The last thing job candidates need to do is spend money they do not have on mechanical thank-you notes and postage.
One experimental propulsion system embeds thousands of tiny explosive charges in a piece of silicon the size of a postage stamp.
Collecting shoes is probably no more silly than collecting postage stamps or vintage teddy-bears.
Slap on an address tab and postage, and it should be good for mail and shipping with little or no preparation.
There are a lot of cheaply built new vacant houses in those markets, on postage-sized lots, driving down the value of all houses.
The finished devices are squares of paper roughly the size of postage stamps.
British Dictionary definitions for postage
postage (ˈpəʊstɪdʒ)
 
n
a.  the charge for delivering a piece of mail
 b.  (as modifier): postage charges

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for postage
postage
"cost of sending something by mail," 1654, from post (3). Postage stamp is attested from 1840; they were recorded as being collected in albums by 1862.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Tile value for postage

10
12
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with postage