predictability

[pri-dik-tuh-bil-i-tee]
noun
1.
consistent repetition of a state, course of action, behavior, or the like, making it possible to know in advance what to expect: The predictability of their daily lives was both comforting and boring.
2.
the quality of being regarded as likely to happen, as behavior or an event: We were disheartened by the utter predictability of war.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
predict (prɪˈdɪkt)
 
vb
(tr; may take a clause as object) to state or make a declaration about in advance, esp on a reasoned basis; foretell
 
[C17: from Latin praedīcere to mention beforehand, from prae before + dīcere to say]
 
pre'dictable
 
adj
 
predicta'bility
 
n
 
pre'dictableness
 
n
 
pre'dictably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
But compared to broiling, frying or microwaving your bread, you can't beat the
  convenient predictability of a toaster.
On the other hand, our staff always seems to scramble with frantic
  determination despite the predictability of these tidal events.
They provide clarity and predictability, a way of quickly categorizing
  information.
Or something can-a family of four pauses beside a station wagon, whose
  predictability makes matters worse.
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