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prepossess

[pree-puh-zes] /ˌpri pəˈzɛs/
verb (used with object)
1.
to possess or dominate mentally beforehand, as a prejudice does.
2.
to prejudice or bias, especially favorably.
3.
to impress favorably beforehand or at the outset.
Origin of prepossess
1605-1615
1605-15; pre- + possess
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for prepossess
Historical Examples
  • He was a tall, fine-looking man, thin and not badly made, but there was something in his face which did not prepossess one.

    Wild Margaret Geraldine Fleming
  • The first view I had of this individual did not prepossess me in his favour.

    Sheilah McLeod Guy Boothby
  • But again I ask, do not strive to prepossess me against him.

    My Novel, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • I saw him again, as you shall hear, but he failed to prepossess me in his favour.

  • prepossess by your air, address, and manners; persuade by your tongue; and you will easily execute what your head has contrived.

  • If you prepossess your mind with a theme, you do not give him an even chance.

  • Their thin and pallid faces did not prepossess me in favour of the life they were leading.

    Dick Cheveley W. H. G. Kingston
  • He was a tall, stout fellow, but of a low and brutish appearance, which did not prepossess one in his favor.

  • What we hear of Frisby Morton does not tend to prepossess us in his favor.

    Christopher Quarles Percy James Brebner
  • His countenance wore a reckless look that did not serve to prepossess him with the people at whose mercy he stood.

    That Affair Next Door Anna Katharine Green
British Dictionary definitions for prepossess

prepossess

/ˌpriːpəˈzɛs/
verb (transitive)
1.
to preoccupy or engross mentally
2.
to influence in advance for or against a person or thing; prejudice; bias
3.
to make a favourable impression on beforehand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for prepossess
v.

1610s, "to get possession of beforehand," from pre- + possess. Meaning "to possess (a person) beforehand with a feeling, notion, etc." is from 1630s; specifically, "to cause (someone) to have a favorable opinion of something" (1640s). Related: Prepossessed; prepossessing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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16
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