presage

[n. pres-ij; v. pres-ij, pri-seyj]
noun
1.
a presentiment or foreboding.
2.
something that portends or foreshadows a future event; an omen, prognostic, or warning indication.
3.
prophetic significance; augury.
4.
foresight; prescience.
5.
Archaic. a forecast or prediction.
verb (used with object), presaged, presaging.
6.
to have a presentiment of.
7.
to portend, foreshow, or foreshadow: The incidents may presage war.
8.
to forecast; predict.
verb (used without object), presaged, presaging.
9.
to make a prediction.
10.
Archaic. to have a presentiment.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English (noun) < Middle French presage < Latin praesāgium presentiment, forewarning, equivalent to praesāg(us) having a foreboding (prae- pre- + sāgus prophetic; cf. sagacious) + -ium -ium

presageful, adjective
presagefully, adverb
presager, noun
unpresaged, adjective
unpresaging, adjective


1. foreshadowing, indication, premonition. 2. portent, sign, token.
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World English Dictionary
presage
 
n
1.  an intimation or warning of something about to happen; portent; omen
2.  a sense of what is about to happen; foreboding
3.  archaic a forecast or prediction
 
vb
4.  (tr) to have a presentiment of
5.  (tr) to give a forewarning of; portend
6.  (intr) to make a prediction
 
[C14: from Latin praesāgium presentiment, from praesāgīre to perceive beforehand, from sāgīre to perceive acutely]
 
pre'sageful
 
adj
 
pre'sagefully
 
adv
 
pre'sager
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

presage
1390 (n.) "something that portends," from L. præsagium "a foreboding," from præsagire "to perceive beforehand, forebode," from præsagus "foreboding," from præ- "before" + sagus "prophetic," related to sagire "perceive" (see sagacious). The verb
is first attested 1562, from M.Fr. présager (16c.), from présage "omen," from L. præsagium.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The transaction is the largest buyout in the for-profit education sector and
  could presage a wave of similar deals.
Whatever the amount, the case might presage major changes in the way college
  athletes are treated.
The dictator's funeral may presage political change.
Some of the quiet types could presage devastating tsunamis or larger,
  ground-shaking shocks.
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