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pretension1

[pri-ten-shuh n] /prɪˈtɛn ʃən/
noun
1.
the laying of a claim to something.
2.
a claim or title to something.
3.
Often, pretensions. a claim made, especially indirectly or by implication, to some quality, merit, or the like:
They laughed at my pretensions to superior judgment.
4.
a claim to dignity, importance, or merit.
6.
the act of pretending or alleging.
7.
an allegation of doubtful veracity.
8.
a pretext.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; < Medieval Latin praetēnsiōn- (stem of praetēnsiō). See pretense, -ion

pretension2

[pree-ten-shuh n] /priˈtɛn ʃən/
verb (used with object)
1.
(in prestressed-concrete construction) to apply tension to (reinforcing strands) before the concrete is poured.
Compare posttension (def 1).
2.
to make (a concrete member) with pretensioned reinforcement.
Origin
1935-40; pre- + tension
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for pretension
  • From first to last, this amusing pretension has garnished his public oratory, and the responses of fluent sycophants.
  • Your arrogant pretension of truth is what deserves pity.
  • It lacks any pretension to depth as a psychological portrait.
  • Erudition is valued, and so is a smattering of pretension.
  • They warmed to the lack of pretension about the former physicist.
  • Anyone who says otherwise is simply demonstrating their pretension for the sake of demonstrating their pretension.
  • It was a curious event, sicklied o'er with the pale cast of pretension.
  • The end result is that economics offers too little practical benefits and too much pretension of science.
  • It's sincerity rather than camp, but it's likewise an affront to pretension because you're not playing the game.
  • And everywhere he looked, he could find only the pretension to knowledge, not knowledge itself.
British Dictionary definitions for pretension

pretension

/prɪˈtɛnʃən/
noun
1.
(often pl) a false or unsupportable claim, esp to merit, worth, or importance
2.
a specious or unfounded allegation; pretext
3.
the state or quality of being pretentious
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pretension
n.

mid-15c., "assertion, allegation; objection; intention; signification," from Medieval Latin pretensionem (nominative praetensio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin praetendere "stretch in front, put forward, allege" (see pretend (v.)). Meaning "unproven claim" is from c.1600. Sense of "ostentation" is from 1727.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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12
15
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