probable

[prob-uh-buhl]
adjective
1.
likely to occur or prove true: He foresaw a probable business loss. He is the probable writer of the article.
2.
having more evidence for than against, or evidence that inclines the mind to belief but leaves some room for doubt.
3.
affording ground for belief.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin probābilis likely, literally, capable of standing a test, equivalent to probā(re) to test (see probe) + -bilis -ble

nonprobable, adjective
nonprobably, adverb
quasi-probable, adjective
quasi-probably, adverb
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World English Dictionary
probable (ˈprɒbəbəl)
 
adj
1.  likely to be or to happen but not necessarily so
2.  most likely: the probable cause of the accident
 
n
3.  a person who is probably to be chosen for a team, event, etc
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin probābilis that may be proved, from probāre to prove]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

probable
late 14c., from O.Fr. probable (14c.), from L. probabilis "provable," from probare "to try, to test" (see prove). Probable cause as a legal term is attested from 1670s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
That's one reason that continued fast growth among global for-profits seems
  probable.
It is probable that the coalition will continue in government.
Rather, the researchers have identified large icebergs as the probable cause.
If a new patient tests positive, it is actually more probable that the patient
  is healthy than sick.
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