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procreate

[proh-kree-eyt] /ˈproʊ kriˌeɪt/
verb (used with object), procreated, procreating.
1.
to beget or generate (offspring).
2.
to produce; bring into being.
verb (used without object), procreated, procreating.
3.
to beget offspring.
4.
to produce; bring into being.
Origin
1530-1540
1530-40; < Latin prōcreātus, past participle of prōcreāre to breed. See pro-1, create
Related forms
procreation, noun
procreative, adjective
procreativeness, noun
procreator, noun
nonprocreation, noun
nonprocreative, adjective
unprocreated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for procreation
  • Secondly it explains that miss carriage is less luckily also a reason why more procreation occurs.
  • Or perhaps having a musical ear fosters human musical gatherings, thus increasing chances of survival and procreation.
  • Yes procreation is a drive, but legally it is your right.
  • Once the first generation is up and running, they could carry on procreation in the usual manner.
  • procreation is too much a part of us to vanquish quickly.
  • The evolutionary track would say this since it does not an evolutionary purpose which is procreation.
  • But this also strikes me as a rather problematic point-and not unlike the argument that marriage is for procreation.
  • procreation should be free unless there is a particular problem.
  • Hotels have tried every conceivable kind of promotion, and here's the latest: the procreation vacation.
  • procreation is seen as more of a societal duty rather than a personal choice.
British Dictionary definitions for procreation

procreate

/ˈprəʊkrɪˌeɪt/
verb
1.
to beget or engender (offspring)
2.
(transitive) to bring into being
Derived Forms
procreant, procreative, adjective
procreation, noun
procreator, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin prōcreāre, from pro-1 + creāre to create
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for procreation
n.

late 14c., "process of begetting offspring," from Old French procreacion (14c., Modern French prócreation) and directly from Latin procreationem (nominative procreatio) "a begetting, generation," noun of action from past participle stem of procreare "bring forth" (offspring), "beget, generate, produce," from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + creare "create" (see create).

procreate

v.

1530s, a back formation from procreation or else from Latin procreatus, past participle of procreare "to beget, bring forth" (see procreation). Related: Procreated; procreating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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procreation in Medicine

procreate pro·cre·ate (prō'krē-āt')
v. pro·cre·at·ed, pro·cre·at·ing, pro·cre·ates

  1. To beget and conceive offspring; to reproduce.

  2. To produce or create; originate.


pro'cre·a'tion n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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