profusion

[pruh-fyoo-zhuhn]
noun
1.
abundance; abundant quantity.
2.
a great quantity or amount (often followed by of ).
3.
lavish spending; extravagance.

Origin:
1535–45; < Latin profūsiōn- (stem of profūsiō) a pouring out, extravagance, orig. libation; see profuse, fusion

1. abundance, plenty, profusion (see synonym study at plenty) ; 2. perfusion, profusion.


1. copiousness, bounty. See plenty. 3. prodigality, profligacy, excess, waste.


1. scarcity.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
profuse (prəˈfjuːs)
 
adj
1.  plentiful, copious, or abundant: profuse compliments
2.  (often foll by in) free or generous in the giving (of): profuse in thanks
 
[C15: from Latin profundere to pour lavishly]
 
pro'fusely
 
adv
 
pro'fuseness
 
n
 
pro'fusion
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

profusion
1540s, from L. profusionem (nom. profusio) "a pouring out," from profusus (see profuse).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Governments with limited resources are often ill-equipped to monitor a
  profusion of local and regional newspapers.
So many firms rushed to install solar panels in such profusion that the world
  ran short of the type of silicon used to make them.
The shrewdest producers have realised that this profusion of spin-offs opens up
  a new approach to storytelling.
Although growing choice and the profusion of platforms is indeed crushing
  smaller shows, it is helping the biggest ones thrive.
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