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profusion

[pruh-fyoo-zhuh n] /prəˈfyu ʒən/
noun
1.
abundance; abundant quantity.
2.
a great quantity or amount (often followed by of).
3.
lavish spending; extravagance.
Origin
1535-1545
1535-45; < Latin profūsiōn- (stem of profūsiō) a pouring out, extravagance, orig. libation; see profuse, fusion
Can be confused
abundance, plenty, profusion (see synonym study at plenty)
perfusion, profusion.
Synonyms
1. copiousness, bounty. See plenty. 3. prodigality, profligacy, excess, waste.
Antonyms
1. scarcity.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for profusion
  • Governments with limited resources are often ill-equipped to monitor a profusion of local and regional newspapers.
  • So many firms rushed to install solar panels in such profusion that the world ran short of the type of silicon used to make them.
  • The shrewdest producers have realised that this profusion of spin-offs opens up a new approach to storytelling.
  • Although growing choice and the profusion of platforms is indeed crushing smaller shows, it is helping the biggest ones thrive.
  • The reason for this profusion is that cookbooks promise to effect a kind of domestic alchemy.
  • The critters-a profusion of different varieties and sizes from tiny turtle to giant carp-must make do with close quarters.
  • There seems to be a profusion of fabulous kids' books these days, including many engaging books on scientific topics.
  • Pretty much all of these people were toasted on the local wine, which flowed in great and delicious profusion.
  • The profusion of fonts is one more product of the digital revolution.
  • One reason so many colleges have improved is the profusion of able faculty members.
Word Origin and History for profusion
n.

1540s, from Middle French profusion (16c.) and directly from Late Latin profusionem (nominative profusio) "a pouring out," noun of action from past participle stem of profundere (see profuse).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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