prognostication

Use Prognostication in a sentence

prognostication

[prog-nos-ti-key-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of prognosticating.
2.
a forecast or prediction.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English pronosticacion < Medieval Latin prognōsticātiōn- (stem of prognōsticātiō). See prognosticate, -ion

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
prognosticate (prɒɡˈnɒstɪˌkeɪt)
 
vb
1.  to foretell (future events) according to present signs or indications; prophesy
2.  (tr) to foreshadow or portend
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin prognōsticāre to predict]
 
prognosti'cation
 
n
 
prog'nosticative
 
adj
 
prog'nosticator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prognostication
early 15c., from O.Fr. pronosticacion (14c.), from M.L. prognosticationem (nom. prognosticatio), from prognosticatus, pp. of prognosticare "foretell," from L. prognostica "sign to forecast weather," from neuter plural of Gk. prognostikos "foreknowing," from progignoskein (see prognosis).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
University presses have had concerns similar to those evoked by this prognostication of the obsolescence of academic libraries.
Let's learn to be humbler about our alleged powers of prognostication and fear-mongering.
In developing these three parts of prognostication models, quality diagnostics and sensor information were considered imperative.
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