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propense

[proh-pens] /proʊˈpɛns/
adjective, Archaic.
1.
having a tendency toward; prone; inclined.
Origin of propense
1520-1530
1520-30; < Latin prōpēnsus, past participle of prōpendēre to propend
Related forms
propensely, adverb
propenseness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for propense
Historical Examples
  • Thou know'st Achilles fiery, and propense Blame to impute even where blame is none.

  • I shall provide in them a particular antidote to those defects to which nature has made you most propense.

    Four Early Pamphlets William Godwin
  • This indeed is a conclusion to which the unprincipled and the vicious are ever propense.

    Four Early Pamphlets William Godwin
  • Thou know'st how rash is youth, and how propense To pass the bounds by decency prescribed,730 Quick, but not wise.

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Difficulty index for propense

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Word Value for propense

12
15
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