propitiation

[pruh-pish-ee-ey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of propitiating; conciliation: the propitiation of the wrathful gods.
2.
something that propitiates.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English propiciacioun < Late Latin propitiātiōn- (stem of propitiātiō) appeasement. See propitiate, -ion

nonpropitiation, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
propitiate (prəˈpɪʃɪˌeɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to appease or make well disposed; conciliate
 
[C17: from Latin propitiāre to appease, from propitius gracious]
 
pro'pitiable
 
adj
 
propiti'ation
 
n
 
propiti'atious
 
adj
 
pro'pitiative
 
adj
 
pro'pitiator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

propitiation
late 14c., from L.L. propitiationem (nom. propitiatio) "an atonement," from L. propitiare "render favorable," from propitius "favorable, gracious, kind," from pro- "forward" + petere "go to" (see petition). Earliest recorded form of the word is propitiatorium "the mercy
seat, place of atonement" (c.1200), translating Gk. hilasterion.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Propitiation definition


that by which God is rendered propitious, i.e., by which it becomes consistent with his character and government to pardon and bless the sinner. The propitiation does not procure his love or make him loving; it only renders it consistent for him to execise his love towards sinners. In Rom. 3:25 and Heb. 9:5 (A.V., "mercy-seat") the Greek word _hilasterion_ is used. It is the word employed by the LXX. translators in Ex. 25:17 and elsewhere as the equivalent for the Hebrew _kapporeth_, which means "covering," and is used of the lid of the ark of the covenant (Ex. 25:21; 30:6). This Greek word (hilasterion) came to denote not only the mercy-seat or lid of the ark, but also propitation or reconciliation by blood. On the great day of atonement the high priest carried the blood of the sacrifice he offered for all the people within the veil and sprinkled with it the "mercy-seat," and so made propitiation. In 1 John 2:2; 4:10, Christ is called the "propitiation for our sins." Here a different Greek word is used (hilasmos). Christ is "the propitiation," because by his becoming our substitute and assuming our obligations he expiated our guilt, covered it, by the vicarious punishment which he endured. (Comp. Heb. 2:17, where the expression "make reconciliation" of the A.V. is more correctly in the R.V. "make propitiation.")

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
He carried his head on one side, partly in modest depreciation of himself, partly in modest propitiation of everybody else.
Do not despise any honest propitiation, however small, in dealing with your editor.
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