propulsion

[pruh-puhl-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act or process of propelling.
2.
the state of being propelled.
3.
a means of propelling; propelling force, impulse, etc.

Origin:
1605–15; < Latin prōpuls(us) (past participle of prōpellere to propel) + -ion

propulsive [pruh-puhl-siv] , propulsory, adjective
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World English Dictionary
propulsion (prəˈpʌlʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of propelling or the state of being propelled
2.  a propelling force
 
[C15: from Latin prōpellere to propel]
 
propulsive
 
adj
 
pro'pulsory
 
adj

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

propulsion
1611, "expulsion," noun of action formed from pp. stem of L. propellere "to propel" (see propel). Meaning "act of driving forward" first attested 1799.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

propulsion pro·pul·sion (prə-pŭl'shən)
n.

  1. A driving or propelling force.

  2. The leaning or falling forward characteristic of the festination of parkinsonism.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Athletes' biceps do indeed begin to bulge, but so do the linings and propulsive muscles of their intestine.
His solos are light yet propulsive, building inexorably and seamlessly from skittering rhythm lines.
Her work is rarely propulsive-little moves forward, including her characters' ideas about the world.
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